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NASA spacecraft to collide a small moonlet in 2022

In May, Uber launched a new experiment: selling train and bus tickets through its app for its customers in Denver, Colorado. Today, the company reports that it has sold over 1,200 tickets for the city’s Regional Transportation District, which operates Denver’s public transportation system.

THE COMPANY REPORTS GROWTH AVERAGING 42 PERCENT EACH WEEK DURING THE ROLLOUT PERIOD

Uber Transit, the company’s in-app ticketing feature, was made available to a small cohort of customers in May, and it has since become available to 100 percent of Uber users in Denver as of June 25th. The company reports growth averaging 42 percent each week during the rollout period.

Uber may not make any money when it sells bus and subway tickets through its app, but it is seeing an uptick in business as a result. Since Uber launched its transit planning feature in January, Uber trips in Denver that start or end at a transit station have grown 11.6 percent. This helps bolster Uber’s claim that it is helping solve the first mile / last mile challenge that plagues many cities.

Uber also said that the number of repeat ticket purchases has increased every week since ticketing launched. As of the week of June 24th, approximately 25 percent of tickets sold were purchased by users who had previously purchased tickets on the app.

Uber’s new transit feature is powered by Masabi, a London-based tech company that builds mobile ticketing software for public transportation. This is the first incarnation of Uber and Masabi’s partnership since the two companies first struck a deal last year to integrate the latter’s mobile ticketing platform into the former’s app. Uber riders in Denver have been able to see real-time bus and rail information when they open the app since January, courtesy of transit data firm Moovit.

For now, Uber is taking its first foray into public transportation slowly, one city at a time. So far, the company offers real-time subway and bus schedules, time and cost comparisons, and point-to-point directions for customers in London and Boston. It most likely will launch ticket purchasing in those cities later this year.

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Black Hole: searching for what can’t be seen

In May, Uber launched a new experiment: selling train and bus tickets through its app for its customers in Denver, Colorado. Today, the company reports that it has sold over 1,200 tickets for the city’s Regional Transportation District, which operates Denver’s public transportation system.

THE COMPANY REPORTS GROWTH AVERAGING 42 PERCENT EACH WEEK DURING THE ROLLOUT PERIOD

Uber Transit, the company’s in-app ticketing feature, was made available to a small cohort of customers in May, and it has since become available to 100 percent of Uber users in Denver as of June 25th. The company reports growth averaging 42 percent each week during the rollout period.

Uber may not make any money when it sells bus and subway tickets through its app, but it is seeing an uptick in business as a result. Since Uber launched its transit planning feature in January, Uber trips in Denver that start or end at a transit station have grown 11.6 percent. This helps bolster Uber’s claim that it is helping solve the first mile / last mile challenge that plagues many cities.

Uber also said that the number of repeat ticket purchases has increased every week since ticketing launched. As of the week of June 24th, approximately 25 percent of tickets sold were purchased by users who had previously purchased tickets on the app.

Uber’s new transit feature is powered by Masabi, a London-based tech company that builds mobile ticketing software for public transportation. This is the first incarnation of Uber and Masabi’s partnership since the two companies first struck a deal last year to integrate the latter’s mobile ticketing platform into the former’s app. Uber riders in Denver have been able to see real-time bus and rail information when they open the app since January, courtesy of transit data firm Moovit.

For now, Uber is taking its first foray into public transportation slowly, one city at a time. So far, the company offers real-time subway and bus schedules, time and cost comparisons, and point-to-point directions for customers in London and Boston. It most likely will launch ticket purchasing in those cities later this year.

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Dream of ubiquitous social robots still aren’t coming true

In May, Uber launched a new experiment: selling train and bus tickets through its app for its customers in Denver, Colorado. Today, the company reports that it has sold over 1,200 tickets for the city’s Regional Transportation District, which operates Denver’s public transportation system.

THE COMPANY REPORTS GROWTH AVERAGING 42 PERCENT EACH WEEK DURING THE ROLLOUT PERIOD

Uber Transit, the company’s in-app ticketing feature, was made available to a small cohort of customers in May, and it has since become available to 100 percent of Uber users in Denver as of June 25th. The company reports growth averaging 42 percent each week during the rollout period.

Uber may not make any money when it sells bus and subway tickets through its app, but it is seeing an uptick in business as a result. Since Uber launched its transit planning feature in January, Uber trips in Denver that start or end at a transit station have grown 11.6 percent. This helps bolster Uber’s claim that it is helping solve the first mile / last mile challenge that plagues many cities.

Uber also said that the number of repeat ticket purchases has increased every week since ticketing launched. As of the week of June 24th, approximately 25 percent of tickets sold were purchased by users who had previously purchased tickets on the app.

Uber’s new transit feature is powered by Masabi, a London-based tech company that builds mobile ticketing software for public transportation. This is the first incarnation of Uber and Masabi’s partnership since the two companies first struck a deal last year to integrate the latter’s mobile ticketing platform into the former’s app. Uber riders in Denver have been able to see real-time bus and rail information when they open the app since January, courtesy of transit data firm Moovit.

For now, Uber is taking its first foray into public transportation slowly, one city at a time. So far, the company offers real-time subway and bus schedules, time and cost comparisons, and point-to-point directions for customers in London and Boston. It most likely will launch ticket purchasing in those cities later this year.

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Amazon CEO unveils lunar lander project ‘Blue Moon’

In May, Uber launched a new experiment: selling train and bus tickets through its app for its customers in Denver, Colorado. Today, the company reports that it has sold over 1,200 tickets for the city’s Regional Transportation District, which operates Denver’s public transportation system.

THE COMPANY REPORTS GROWTH AVERAGING 42 PERCENT EACH WEEK DURING THE ROLLOUT PERIOD

Uber Transit, the company’s in-app ticketing feature, was made available to a small cohort of customers in May, and it has since become available to 100 percent of Uber users in Denver as of June 25th. The company reports growth averaging 42 percent each week during the rollout period.

Uber may not make any money when it sells bus and subway tickets through its app, but it is seeing an uptick in business as a result. Since Uber launched its transit planning feature in January, Uber trips in Denver that start or end at a transit station have grown 11.6 percent. This helps bolster Uber’s claim that it is helping solve the first mile / last mile challenge that plagues many cities.

Uber also said that the number of repeat ticket purchases has increased every week since ticketing launched. As of the week of June 24th, approximately 25 percent of tickets sold were purchased by users who had previously purchased tickets on the app.

Uber’s new transit feature is powered by Masabi, a London-based tech company that builds mobile ticketing software for public transportation. This is the first incarnation of Uber and Masabi’s partnership since the two companies first struck a deal last year to integrate the latter’s mobile ticketing platform into the former’s app. Uber riders in Denver have been able to see real-time bus and rail information when they open the app since January, courtesy of transit data firm Moovit.

For now, Uber is taking its first foray into public transportation slowly, one city at a time. So far, the company offers real-time subway and bus schedules, time and cost comparisons, and point-to-point directions for customers in London and Boston. It most likely will launch ticket purchasing in those cities later this year.

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石墨烯层使超分辨率显微镜领先

左边:石墨烯片上单分子的图像。这些图像使科学家能够确定每个分子的位置和方向。与预期图像(右)的比较显示出极好的一致性。图片来源:哥廷根大学

哥廷根大学的研究人员开发出一种新方法,利用石墨烯的不寻常特性,与荧光(发光)分子进行电磁相互作用。这种方法使科学家能够以1‰(十亿分之一米)的数量级光学测量极小的距离,这是第一次具有高精度和可重复性。这使得研究人员能够光学测量脂质双层膜的厚度,脂质双层膜是制造所有活细胞膜的物质。结果发表在Nature Photonics上

由Enderlein教授领导的哥廷根大学的研究人员使用一片石墨烯,只有一个原子厚度(0.34 nm),用于调制发光(荧光)分子接近石墨烯片时的发射。石墨烯优异的光学透明性及其通过空间调制分子发射的能力使其成为测量石墨烯片中单分子距离的极其灵敏的工具。这种方法的准确性非常好,即使是最轻微的距离变化也可以解决1埃左右。科学家们能够通过在石墨烯层上方沉积单个分子来证明这一点。然后他们可以通过监测和评估它们的光发射来确定它们的距离。这种石墨烯诱导的分子发光调制为确定空间中的单个分子位置提供了极其灵敏和精确的“标尺”。他们使用这种方法测量单层脂质双层的厚度,该脂质双层由两层脂肪酸链分子构成,总厚度仅为几纳米。

“我们的方法具有巨大的超分辨率显微镜潜力,因为它允许我们不仅横向(如早期方法)定位纳米分辨率的单分子,而且沿第三方向具有相似的精度,这使得真正的三维光学成像成为可能。大分子的长度尺度,“该论文的第一作者Arindam Ghosh说。

“这将是一个功能强大的工具,可用于解决单个分子,分子复合物或小细胞器中亚纳米精度的许多应用,”该出版物的通讯作者兼第三物理研究所(生物物理学)负责人JörgEnderlein教授补充道。 )工作发生的地方。

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SpaceX to debut new crew capsule in test flight

In May, Uber launched a new experiment: selling train and bus tickets through its app for its customers in Denver, Colorado. Today, the company reports that it has sold over 1,200 tickets for the city’s Regional Transportation District, which operates Denver’s public transportation system.

THE COMPANY REPORTS GROWTH AVERAGING 42 PERCENT EACH WEEK DURING THE ROLLOUT PERIOD

Uber Transit, the company’s in-app ticketing feature, was made available to a small cohort of customers in May, and it has since become available to 100 percent of Uber users in Denver as of June 25th. The company reports growth averaging 42 percent each week during the rollout period.

Uber may not make any money when it sells bus and subway tickets through its app, but it is seeing an uptick in business as a result. Since Uber launched its transit planning feature in January, Uber trips in Denver that start or end at a transit station have grown 11.6 percent. This helps bolster Uber’s claim that it is helping solve the first mile / last mile challenge that plagues many cities.

Uber also said that the number of repeat ticket purchases has increased every week since ticketing launched. As of the week of June 24th, approximately 25 percent of tickets sold were purchased by users who had previously purchased tickets on the app.

Uber’s new transit feature is powered by Masabi, a London-based tech company that builds mobile ticketing software for public transportation. This is the first incarnation of Uber and Masabi’s partnership since the two companies first struck a deal last year to integrate the latter’s mobile ticketing platform into the former’s app. Uber riders in Denver have been able to see real-time bus and rail information when they open the app since January, courtesy of transit data firm Moovit.

For now, Uber is taking its first foray into public transportation slowly, one city at a time. So far, the company offers real-time subway and bus schedules, time and cost comparisons, and point-to-point directions for customers in London and Boston. It most likely will launch ticket purchasing in those cities later this year.